Turbocharging LiFi with semi-polar lasers

22nd February 2017
A record-breaking bandwidth makes the violet semi-polar laser well suited for visible light communication 
BY CHANGMIN LEE, JAMES S. SPECK, SHUJI NAKAMURA AND STEVEN P. DENBAARS FROM UCSB, CHAO SHEN AND BOON S. OOI FROM KAUST, AND AHMED Y. ALYAMANI AND MUNIR M. EL-DESOUKI FROM KACST
 
A radio-frequency famine looms. Usage of mobile wireless is rocketing, and compromises must be made to meet this demand within the allocated spectrum. Introducing more complex systems are on the agenda, alongside new coding to support a surge in mobile data, but whichever path is taken will be challenging and inefficient.
 
One way to mitigate the impending RF crisis is to shift to the visible spectrum. This is not a new idea, as visible light communication has been studied since the emergence of blue LEDs with incandescent-level output powers. But recently this technology has been gathering pace, spurred on by the first demonstration of light-fidelity – commonly known as LiFi – in 2011, by Harald Haas’ group at the University of Edinburgh, UK.
Phosphors are detrimental to the modulation bandwidths of white lighting systems based on LEDs and laser diodes.
Phosphors are detrimental to the modulation bandwidths of white lighting systems based on LEDs and laser diodes.

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